Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Downey v. United States

United States District Court, D. Delaware

October 30, 2019

MARK DOWNEY, Plaintiff,
v.
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Defendant.

          Mark Downey, McLean, Virginia. Pro Se Plaintiff.

          MEMORANDUM OPINION

          CONNOLLY, U.S. DISTRICT JUDGE:

         I. INTRODUCTION

         Plaintiff Mark Downey ("Plaintiff"), proceeds pro se and has been granted leave to proceed in forma pauperise[1](D.I. 7) He filed this Complaint as a qui tarn action under the False Claims Act, presumably pursuant to 18 U.S.C. §§ 286-287 and 31 U.S.C. §§ 3729-3733, [2] and the Dodd-Frank Act.[3] (D.I. 3) The Complaint also invokes numerous federal criminal and civil statutes. In addition, Plaintiff filed a combined motion to quash sovereign immunity, motion to accommodate the disabled, motion to expedite and seal, motion to refer criminal case to the U.S. Attorney, and motion to designate the primary defendant for the defendant class action claim. (D.I. 1) The Court proceeds to review and screen the matter pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1915(e)(2)(b).[4]

         II. BACKGROUND

         The crux of the Complaint, which is 77 pages of text purporting to include 45 counts, is that Plaintiff seeks to bring a "qui tarn action under "the False Claims Act and the Dodd Frank Act to generate revenues for the Federal Government to dramatically reduce the mounting $21 Trillion Federal Budget Deficit for our Children's Children; 70% for the Federal Government and 3-0% for the Disabled Plaintiff." (D.I. 3 at 4) Plaintiff seeks $1, 063.48 billion and, in the claim for relief (D.I. 3 at ¶ IV), states that his work of five years was illegally destroyed by the Federal Government, he received no compensation and "the unjustified whistleblower claim denial recourse is to file suit." (D.I. 3 at ¶ IV; D.I. 3-1 at 7)

         III. LEGAL STANDARDS

         A federal court may properly dismiss an action sua sponte under the screening provisions of 28 U.S.C. § 1915(e)(2)(B) if "the action is frivolous or malicious, fails to state a claim upon which relief may be granted, or seeks monetary relief from a defendant who is immune from such relief." Ball v. Famiglio, 726 F.3d 448, 452 (3d Cir. 2013); see also 28 U.S.C. § 1915(e)(2) (in forma pauperis actions). The Court must accept all factual allegations in a complaint as true and take them in the light most favorable to a pro se plaintiff. See Phillips v. County of Allegheny, 515 F.3d 224, 229 (3d Cir. 2008); Erickson v. Pardus, 551 U.S. 89, 93 (2007). Because Plaintiff proceeds pro se, his pleading is liberally construed and his Complaint, "however inartfully pleaded, must be held to less stringent standards than formal pleadings drafted by lawyers." Erickson, 551 U.S. at 94 (citations omitted).

         An action is frivolous if it "lacks an arguable basis either in law or in fact." Neitzke v. Williams, 490 U.S. 319, 325 (1989). Under 28 U.S.C. § 1915(e)(2)(B)(i), a court may dismiss a complaint as frivolous if it is "based on an indisputably meritless legal theory" or a "clearly baseless" or "fantastic or delusional" factual scenario. Neitzke, 490 U.S. at 327-28; see also Wilson v. Rackmill, 878 F.2d 772, 774 (3d Cir. 1989).

         The legal standard for dismissing a complaint for failure to state a claim pursuant to § 1915(e)(2)(B)(ii) is identical to the legal standard used when deciding Rule 12(b)(6) motions. See Tourscher v. McCullough, 184 F.3d 236, 240 (3d Cir. 1999) (applying Fed.R.Civ.P. 12(b)(6) standard to dismissal for failure to state a claim under § 1915(e)(2)(B)). However, before dismissing a complaint or claims for failure to state a claim upon which relief can be granted pursuant to the screening provisions of 28 U.S.C. § 1915, the Court must grant a plaintiff leave to amend his complaint unless amendment would be inequitable or futile. See Grayson v. Mayview State Hosp., 293 F.3d 103, 114 (3d Cir. 2002).

         A complaint may be dismissed only if, accepting the well-pleaded allegations in the complaint as true and viewing them in the light most favorable to the plaintiff, a court concludes that those allegations "could not raise a claim of entitlement to relief." Bell Atl. Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 544, 558 (2007). Though "detailed factual allegations" are not required, a complaint must do more than simply provide "labels and conclusions" or "a formulaic recitation of the elements of a cause of action." Daws v. Abington Mem'l Hosp., 765 F.3d 236, 241 (3d Cir. 2014) (internal quotation marks omitted). In addition, a complaint must contain sufficient factual matter, accepted as true, to state a claim to relief that is plausible on its face. See Williams v. BASF Catalysts LLC, 765 F.3d 306, 315 (3d Cir. 2014) (citing Ashcroft v. Iqbal, 556 U.S. 662, 678 (2009) and Twombly, 550 U.S. at 570). Finally, a plaintiff must plead facts sufficient to show that a claim has substantive plausibility. See Johnson v. City of Shelby, 574 U.S. 10 (2014). A complaint may not be dismissed for imperfect statements of the legal theory supporting the claim asserted. See id. at 10.

         A court reviewing the sufficiency of a complaint must take three steps: (1) take note of the elements the plaintiff must plead to state a claim; (2) identify allegations that, because they are no more than conclusions, are not entitled to the assumption of truth; and (3) assume the veracity of any well-pleaded factual allegations and then determine whether those allegations plausibly give rise to an entitlement to relief. Connelly v. Lane Const. Corp., 809 F.3d 780, 787 (3d Cir. 2016) (internal citations and quotations omitted). Elements are sufficiently alleged when the facts in the complaint "show" that the plaintiff is entitled to. relief. Iqbal, 556 U.S. at 679 (quoting Fed.R.Civ.P. 8(a)(2)). Deciding whether a claim is plausible will be a "context-specific task that requires the reviewing court to draw on its judicial experience and common sense." Id.

         IV. DISCUSSION

         Plaintiff has filed this action as a qui tarn proceeding under the False Claims Act. It appears that Plaintiff seeks statutory proceeds of the qui tam action or settlement of the claim under 31 U.S.C. ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.