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Stewart v. Wilmington Trust SP Services Inc.

Court of Chancery of Delaware, New Castle

April 27, 2015

The Honorable Karen Weldin Stewart, CIR-ML, Insurance Commissioner
v.
Wilmington Trust SP Services, Inc., et al.

Date Submitted: April 6, 2015

Dear Counsel:

In an opinion dated March 26, 2015, I granted in part and denied in part motions to dismiss filed by certain Defendants in this action (the "Opinion").[1] Specifically, I ruled that: (1) Delaware law governed all of the claims at issue in the Opinion;[2] (2) the Receiver's[3] claims were not barred by laches;[4] (3) the Receiver failed to state claims for breach of fiduciary duty against Wilmington Trust and the Auditor Defendants;[5] (4) the Receiver stated a claim for breach of fiduciary duty against Defendant Kantner;[6] (5) the in pari delicto defense applied to bar the Receiver's breach of contract and negligence claims against Wilmington Trust and the Auditor Defendants;[7] and (6) the Receiver stated claims against Wilmington Trust and Johnson Lambert, but not Kantner or McSoley McCoy, for aiding and abetting a breach of fiduciary duty.[8]

On April 6, 2015, the Receiver timely applied for certification of an interlocutory appeal from the Opinion and associated order pursuant to Court of Chancery Rule 72 and Supreme Court Rules 41 and 42 (the "Application"). The Receiver contends that, in addition to determining a substantial issue and establishing a legal right, the Opinion decided a question of law of first instance in Delaware. In particular, she asserts that an issue decided in the Opinion, i.e., whether "in pari delicto [should] apply to the Receiver's claims against Wilmington Trust and the Auditor Defendants, "[9] never before had been addressed under Delaware law in the "unique context of insurance insolvency proceedings."[10] The Receiver further contends that the Opinion implicates an unsettled question of law because it construes or applies a Delaware statute-the Delaware Uniform Insurers Liquidation Act[11]-in a way that has not been settled by the Delaware Supreme Court.

Defendant Johnson Lambert timely filed an opposition to the Receiver's Application (the "Opposition").[12] It argues that the Opinion did not determine a substantial issue or establish a legal right. The Opposition further contends that the Opinion did not decide an original question of law, but rather applied established legal doctrine to a particular set of facts. Finally, according to the Opposition, the Opinion does not involve an unsettled application of the DUILA, but merely embodies a narrow ruling that certain of the Receiver's claims were subject to the recognized doctrine of in pari delicto. Defendants Wilmington Trust and Kantner (together with Johnson Lambert and McSoley McCoy, "Respondents") also joined in the Opposition. In their submission, Wilmington Trust and Kantner advanced the additional argument that interlocutory review is inappropriate here because the Opinion was not case dispositive, and as a result, certifying the proposed appeal would undermine the efficient administration of justice.

For the reasons set forth below, I find that the Opinion did determine a substantial issue, establish a legal right, and address a legal question of first impression in Delaware. Thus, I conclude that it would be appropriate to grant the Receiver leave to file an interlocutory appeal.

I. STANDARD

Under Supreme Court Rule 42, "No interlocutory appeal will be certified by the trial court or accepted by [the Supreme] Court unless the order of the trial court determines a substantial issue, establishes a legal right, " and meets one or more of five additional criteria enumerated in Rule 42(b)(i)-(v).[13] As relevant here, one of those additional criteria is that the interlocutory appeal would satisfy "[a]ny of the criteria applicable to proceedings for certification of questions of law set forth in Rule 41."[14] In this regard, Rule 41 provides, in pertinent part, that certification of questions of law will be accepted in the Supreme Court's discretion "only where there exist important and urgent reasons for an immediate determination by [the Supreme] Court of the questions certified."[15] Among the illustrative reasons for which the Court might exercise its discretion to accept certification are that the appeal presents an original question of law, or a question of law relating to the constitutionality, construction, or application of a statute of this State which has not been, but should be, settled by the Supreme Court.[16]

II. ANALYSIS

A. Substantial Issue

"An order satisfies the substantial issue requirement when it decides a main question of law relating to the merits of the case, as opposed to some collateral matter, such as a discovery dispute."[17] The Opinion at issue here did decide issues relating to the merits of this case. The Receiver's Complaint contains twelve counts; each charges a Defendant or multiple Defendants with liability under a particular legal theory (i.e., breach of fiduciary duty, breach of contract, negligence, or aiding and abetting a breach of fiduciary duty). Although not every Defendant moved for dismissal, the Opinion ruled, at least partially, on the legal sufficiency of all twelve counts as to anywhere from one to four Defendants on each count.[18] The particular issue the Receiver most clearly seeks to appeal-whether, under Delaware law, in pari delicto bars her claims, acting under the DUILA, against Wilmington Trust and the Auditor Defendants-was for those Defendants determinative as to eight of the Complaint's twelve counts.[19] Thus, the Opinion "address[ed] and resolve[d] one or more substantive legal issues between the parties, "[20] and cannot be said to have been concerned with "collateral issues" like discovery matters.

In arguing for a contrary conclusion, Respondents contend that an interlocutory appeal will result in piecemeal litigation. Specifically, they assert that some issues not decided by the Opinion may be subject to later appeal by Respondents, and that, regardless of the Supreme Court's decision to affirm or reverse the challenged portions of the Opinion and resulting order, this litigation will continue as to at least some claims against some Defendants. This contention elides the proper inquiry. The "substantial issue" requirement is oriented toward the "efficient operation of our system, "[21] but the primary consideration is whether the decision from which a party seeks to appeal is a decision relating to the merits of the case, or to second-order litigation issues like discovery disputes. The Opinion ruled on the legal merits of several-indeed, most of- the claims at issue in this action as to the four Respondents.[22] Whether or not the efficient administration of justice would be served by accepting this interlocutory appeal ultimately is for the Supreme Court to decide. I am convinced, however, that the substantial issue requirement of Rule 42 has been met.

B. Legal Right

For purposes of appealability under Rule 42, "A legal right is established when a court determines an issue essential to the positions of the parties regarding the merits of the case, i.e., 'where one of the parties' rights has been enhanced or diminished as a result of the order.'"[23] Thus, a decision at the pleadings stage, which merely allows the case to proceed to trial, generally does not "establish a legal right" between the parties.[24]Nevertheless, the Supreme Court has recognized that some ...


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