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Courtesy Prods., L.L.C. v. Hamilton Beach Brands, Inc.

United States District Court, D. Delaware

November 5, 2014

COURTESY PRODUCTS, L.L.C., Plaintiff,
v.
HAMILTON BEACH BRANDS, INC., Defendant

Page 436

Steven J. Balick, Esquire, Tiffany Geyer Lydon, Esquire, and Andrew C. Mayo, Esquire of Ashby & Geddes, Wilmington, Delaware. Counsel for Plaintiff.

Richard L. Horwitz, Esquire, David E. Moore, Esquire, and Bindu A. Palapura, Esquire of Potter Anderson & Corroon LLP, Wilmington, Delaware. Counsel for Defendant.

Page 437

MEMORANDUM OPINION

SUE L. ROBINSON, United States District Judge.

I. INTRODUCTION

On December 9, 2013, plaintiff Courtesy Products, L.L.C. (" Courtesy" ) filed a complaint against defendant Hamilton Beach Brands, Inc. (" Hamilton" ) alleging direct and indirect infringement of U.S. Patent Nos. 7,311,037 (" the '037 patent" ), 7,258,884 (" the '884 patent" ), and 7,770,512 (" the '512 patent" ). (D.I. 1) Presently before the court are Hamilton's motions to dismiss the complaint for failure to state a claim (D.I. 8) and for leave to file a motion for partial summary judgment of non-infringement (D.I. 10). The court has jurisdiction over this matter pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § § 1331 and 1338(a).

II. BACKGROUND

Courtesy is a limited liability company organized under the laws of the State of Missouri and has a principle place of business in St. Louis, Missouri. Courtesy sells products including single-serving coffee makers, disposable brew baskets, and coffee filter packs, as well as the CV1® One-Cup Coffee System, throughout the United

Page 438

States. (D.I. 1 at ¶ ¶ 2, 7) Hamilton is incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware and has a principle place of business in Glen Allen, Virginia. Hamilton Beach distributes single-cup coffee makers, disposable brew baskets, and single-cup coffee products throughout the United States. ( Id. at ¶ ¶ 3, 8)

III. STANDARD OF REVIEW

A motion filed under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 12(b)(6) tests the sufficiency of a complaint's factual allegations. Bell A. Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 544, 555, 127 S.Ct. 1955, 167 L.Ed.2d 929 (2007); Kost v. Kozakiewicz, 1 F.3d 176, 183 (3d Cir. 1993). A complaint must contain " a short and plain statement of the claim showing that the pleader is entitled to relief, in order to give the defendant fair notice of what the ... claim is and the grounds upon which it rests." Twombly, 550 U.S. at 545 (internal quotation marks omitted) (interpreting Fed.R.Civ.P. 8(a)). Consistent with the Supreme Court's rulings in Twombly and Ashcroft v. Iqbal, 556 U.S. 662, 129 S.Ct. 1937, 173 L.Ed.2d 868 (2009), the Third Circuit requires a two-part analysis when reviewing a Rule 12(b)(6) motion. Edwards v. A.H. Cornell & Son, Inc., 610 F.3d 217, 219 (3d Cir. 2010); Fowler v. UPMC Shadyside, 578 F.3d 203, 210 (3d Cir. 2009). First, a court should separate the factual and legal elements of a claim, accepting the facts and disregarding the legal conclusions. Fowler, 578 F.3d at 210-11. Second, a court should determine whether the remaining well-pied facts sufficiently show that the plaintiff " has a 'plausible claim for relief." ' Id. at 211 (quoting Iqbal, 556 U.S. at 679). As part of the analysis, a court must accept all well-pleaded factual allegations in the complaint as true, and view them in the light most favorable to the plaintiff. See Erickson v. Pardus, 551 U.S. 89, 94, 127 S.Ct. 2197, 167 L.Ed.2d 1081 (2007); Christopher v. Harbury, 536 U.S. 403, 406, 122 S.Ct. 2179, 153 L.Ed.2d 413 (2002); Phillips v. Cnty. of Allegheny, 515 F.3d 224, 231 (3d Cir. 2008). In this regard, a court may consider the pleadings, public record, orders, exhibits attached to the complaint, and documents incorporated into the complaint by reference. Tellabs, Inc. v. Makor Issues & Rights, Ltd., 551 U.S. 308, 322, 127 S.Ct. 2499, 168 L.Ed.2d 179 (2007); Oshiver v. Levin, Fishbein, Sedran & Berman, 38 F.3d 1380, 1384-85 n.2 (3d Cir. 1994).

The court's determination is not whether the non-moving party " will ultimately prevail" but whether that party is " entitled to offer evidence to support the claims." United States ex rel. Wilkins v. United Health Grp., Inc., 659 F.3d 295, 302 (3d Cir. 2011 ). This " does not impose a probability requirement at the pleading stage," but instead " simply calls for enough facts to raise a reasonable expectation that discovery will reveal evidence of [the necessary element]." Phillips, 515 F.3d at 234 (quoting Twombly, 550 U.S. at 556). The court's analysis is a context-specific task requiring the court " to draw on its judicial experience and common sense." Iqbal, 556 U.S. at 663-64.

IV. DISCUSSION

A. Direct Infringement


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